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Xiu-Sheng Chen, Rui Han, Yan-Ting Liu, Wei Huang, Qi Wang, Xin Xiong, Ying Zhang, Jian-Guo Zhao, Shi-Hua Li, Xiao-Jiang Li, Wei-Li Yang. Comparative analysis of primate and pig cells reveals primate-specific PINK1 expression and phosphorylation. Zoological Research, 2024, 45(2): 242-252. doi: 10.24272/j.issn.2095-8137.2023.241
Citation: Xiu-Sheng Chen, Rui Han, Yan-Ting Liu, Wei Huang, Qi Wang, Xin Xiong, Ying Zhang, Jian-Guo Zhao, Shi-Hua Li, Xiao-Jiang Li, Wei-Li Yang. Comparative analysis of primate and pig cells reveals primate-specific PINK1 expression and phosphorylation. Zoological Research, 2024, 45(2): 242-252. doi: 10.24272/j.issn.2095-8137.2023.241

Comparative analysis of primate and pig cells reveals primate-specific PINK1 expression and phosphorylation

doi: 10.24272/j.issn.2095-8137.2023.241
Supplementary data to this article can be found online.
The authors declare that they have no competing interests.
W.L.Y. and X.J.L. designed and supervised the research experiments. X.S.C., R.H., Y.T.L., W.H., Q.W., and X.X. performed the experiments and analyzed the data. Y.Z. and J.G.Z. provided pig PINK1 KO tissues. S.H.L. provided advice. X.J.L. and W.L.Y. wrote the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final version of the manuscript.
#Authors contributed equally to this work
Funds:  This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (32070534, 32370567, 82371874, 81830032, 31872779, 82071421, 81873736), Key Field Research and Development Program of Guangdong Province (2018B030337001), Guangzhou Key Research Program on Brain Science (202007030008), Department of Science and Technology of Guangdong Province (2021ZT09Y007, 2020B121201006), Guangdong Basic and Applied Basic Research Foundation (2023B1515020031, 2022A1515012301), and Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (Jinan University, 21620358)
More Information
  • Corresponding author: E-mail: weiliyang12@jnu.edu.cn
  • Received Date: 2023-07-30
  • Accepted Date: 2023-09-12
  • Published Online: 2023-09-13
  • PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1), a mitochondrial kinase that phosphorylates Parkin and other proteins, plays a crucial role in mitophagy and protection against neurodegeneration. Mutations in PINK1 and Parkin can lead to loss of function and early onset Parkinson’s disease. However, there is a lack of strong in vivo evidence in rodent models to support the theory that loss of PINK1 affects mitophagy and induces neurodegeneration. Additionally, PINK1 knockout pigs (Sus scrofa) do not appear to exhibit neurodegeneration. In our recent work involving non-human primates, we found that PINK1 is selectively expressed in primate brains, while absent in rodent brains. To extend this to other species, we used multiple antibodies to examine the expression of PINK1 in pig tissues. In contrast to tissues from cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis), our data did not convincingly demonstrate detectable PINK1 expression in pig tissues. Knockdown of PINK1 in cultured pig cells did not result in altered Parkin and BAD phosphorylation, as observed in cultured monkey cells. A comparison of monkey and pig striatum revealed more PINK1-phosphorylated substrates in the monkey brain. Consistently, PINK1 knockout in pigs did not lead to obvious changes in the phosphorylation of Parkin and BAD. These findings provide new evidence that PINK1 expression is specific to primates, underscoring the importance of non-human primates in investigating PINK1 function and pathology related to PINK1 deficiency.
  • Supplementary data to this article can be found online.
    The authors declare that they have no competing interests.
    W.L.Y. and X.J.L. designed and supervised the research experiments. X.S.C., R.H., Y.T.L., W.H., Q.W., and X.X. performed the experiments and analyzed the data. Y.Z. and J.G.Z. provided pig PINK1 KO tissues. S.H.L. provided advice. X.J.L. and W.L.Y. wrote the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final version of the manuscript.
    #Authors contributed equally to this work
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