Volume 36 Issue 6
Nov.  2015
Turn off MathJax
Article Contents

Ding CUI, Yuan ZHOU. Stress-relevant social behaviors of middle-class male cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis). Zoological Research, 2015, 36(6): 337-341. doi: 10.13918/j.issn.2095-8137.2015.6.337
Citation: Ding CUI, Yuan ZHOU. Stress-relevant social behaviors of middle-class male cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis). Zoological Research, 2015, 36(6): 337-341. doi: 10.13918/j.issn.2095-8137.2015.6.337

Stress-relevant social behaviors of middle-class male cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis)

doi: 10.13918/j.issn.2095-8137.2015.6.337
  • Received Date: 2015-09-17
  • Publish Date: 2015-11-18
  • Stress from dominance ranks in human societies, or that of other social animals, especially nonhuman primates, can have negative influences on health. Individuals holding different social status may be burdened with various stress levels. The middle class experiences a special stress situation within the dominance hierarchy due to its position between the higher and lower classes. Behaviorally, questions about where middle-class stress comes from and how individuals adapt to middle-class stress remain poorly understood in nonhuman primates. In the present study, social interactions, including aggression, avoidance, grooming and mounting behaviors, between beta males, as well as among group members holding higher or lower social status, were analyzed in captive male-only cynomolgus monkey groups. We found that aggressive tension from the higher hierarchy members was the main origin of stress for middle-class individuals. However, behaviors such as attacking lower hierarchy members immediately after being the recipient of aggression, as well as increased avoidance, grooming and mounting toward both higher and lower hierarchy members helped alleviate middle-class stress and were particular adaptations to middle-class social status.
  • 加载中
  • [1] Abbott DH, Keverne EB, Bercovitch FB, Shively CA, Mendoza SP, Saltzman W, Snowdon CT, Ziegler TE, Banjevic M, Garland T, Sapolsky, RM. 2003. Are subordinates always stressed? A comparative analysis of rank differences in cortisol levels among primates. Hormones and Behavior , 43(1): 67-82.
    [2] Adler NE, Boyce T, Chesney MA, Cohen S, Folkman S, Kahn RL, Syme SL. 1994. Socioeconomic status and health: The challenge of the gradient. American Psychologist , 49(1): 15-24.
    [3] Adler NE, Boyce WT, Chesney MA, Folkman S, Syme SL. 1993. Socioeconomic inequalities in health: No easy solution. JAMA-the Journal of the American Medical Association , 269(24): 3140-3145.
    [4] Altmann J. 1974. Observational study of behavior: Sampling methods. Behaviour , 49(3): 227-67.
    [5] Aureli F, Van Schaik CP, Van Hooff JA. 1989. Functional aspects of reconciliation among captive long‐tailed macaques ( Macaca fascicularis ). American Journal of Primatology , 19(1): 39-51.
    [6] Bernstein IS, Ehardt CL. 1985. Agonistic aiding: Kinship, rank, age, and sex influences. American Journal of Primatology , 8(1): 37-52.
    [7] Brunner E. 1997. Socioeconomic determinants of health: stress and the biology of inequality. British Medical Journal , 314(7092): 1472-1476.
    [8] Bupa Research. 2013. Managers too stressed to notice junior staff struggle. Retrieved from http://www.bupa.com/media-centre/press-releases/uk/22-nov-2013-managers-too-stressed-to-notice-junior-staff-struggle/.
    [9] Castles D, Whiten A. 1998. Post-conflict behaviour of wild olive baboons. I. Reconciliation, redirection and consolation. Ethology , 104(2): 126-147.
    [10] Cheney DL, Seyfarth RM. 1989. Redirected aggression and reconciliation among vervet monkeys, Cercopithecus aethiops . Behaviour , 110(1): 258-275.
    [11] Cords M. 1992. Post-conflict reunions and reconciliation in long-tailed macaques. Animal Behaviour , 44(1): 57-61.
    [12] Das M, Penke Z, van Hooff JARAM. 1998. Postconflict affiliation and stress-related behavior of long-tailed macaque aggressors. International Journal of Primatology , 19(1): 53-71.
    [13] De Waal FB, Roosmalen A. 1979. Reconciliation and consolation among chimpanzees. Behaviour Ecology Sociobiology , 5(1): 55-66.
    [14] De Waal FB, Yoshihara D. 1983. Reconciliation and redirected affection in rhesus monkeys. Behaviour , 85(3): 224-241.
    [15] Edwards KL, Walker SL, Bodeham RF, Ritchie H, Shultz S. 2013. Associations between social behaviours and adrenal activity in female Barbary macaques: Consequences of study design. General and Comparative Endocrinology , 186: 72-79.
    [16] Faraut L, Northwood A, Majolo B. 2015. The functions of non-reproductive mounts among male Barbary macaques ( Macaca sylvanus ). American Journal of Primatology , 77(11):1149-1157.
    [17] Manuck SB, Marsland AL, Kaplan JR, Williams JK. 1995. The pathogenicity of behavior and its neuroendocrine mediation: An example from coronary artery disease. Psychosomatic Medicine , 57(3): 275-283.
    [18] Sapolsky RM. 2005. The influence of social hierarchy on primate health. Science , 308(1): 648-652.
    [19] Shively CA, Register TC, Friedman DP, Morgan TM, Thompson J, Lanier T. 2005. Social stress-associated depression in adult female cynomolgus monkeys ( Macaca fascicularis ). Biological Psychology , 69(1): 67-84.
    [20] Tian CY, Ma YY. 2014. Involve both genetic and environmental factors to build monkey models of mental disorders. Zoology Research , 35(3): 170-171.
    [21] York AD, Rowell TE. 1988. Reconciliation following aggression in patas monkeys, Erythrocebus patas . Animal Behaviour , 36(2): 502-509.
  • 加载中
通讯作者: 陈斌, bchen63@163.com
  • 1. 

    沈阳化工大学材料科学与工程学院 沈阳 110142

  1. 本站搜索
  2. 百度学术搜索
  3. 万方数据库搜索
  4. CNKI搜索

Article Metrics

Article views(378) PDF downloads(1171) Cited by()

Related
Proportional views

Stress-relevant social behaviors of middle-class male cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis)

doi: 10.13918/j.issn.2095-8137.2015.6.337

Abstract: Stress from dominance ranks in human societies, or that of other social animals, especially nonhuman primates, can have negative influences on health. Individuals holding different social status may be burdened with various stress levels. The middle class experiences a special stress situation within the dominance hierarchy due to its position between the higher and lower classes. Behaviorally, questions about where middle-class stress comes from and how individuals adapt to middle-class stress remain poorly understood in nonhuman primates. In the present study, social interactions, including aggression, avoidance, grooming and mounting behaviors, between beta males, as well as among group members holding higher or lower social status, were analyzed in captive male-only cynomolgus monkey groups. We found that aggressive tension from the higher hierarchy members was the main origin of stress for middle-class individuals. However, behaviors such as attacking lower hierarchy members immediately after being the recipient of aggression, as well as increased avoidance, grooming and mounting toward both higher and lower hierarchy members helped alleviate middle-class stress and were particular adaptations to middle-class social status.

Ding CUI, Yuan ZHOU. Stress-relevant social behaviors of middle-class male cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis). Zoological Research, 2015, 36(6): 337-341. doi: 10.13918/j.issn.2095-8137.2015.6.337
Citation: Ding CUI, Yuan ZHOU. Stress-relevant social behaviors of middle-class male cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis). Zoological Research, 2015, 36(6): 337-341. doi: 10.13918/j.issn.2095-8137.2015.6.337
Reference (21)

Catalog

    /

    DownLoad:  Full-Size Img  PowerPoint
    Return
    Return